Yoga at Home: Keeping Your Practice Going

Posted by – March 13, 2020
Categories: General Fitness & Sports Guest Post Health & Healing

5 Tips to Keep Your Practice Going When You Can’t Go Out

By Mark Stephens, author of the Mark Stephens Yoga Adjustments Deck.

Even with all the will in the world, even the most disciplined among us often find that a home practice just isn’t the same as the experience in a led class that’s fueled in part by the teacher and group energy. But it’s still possible to get in a good practice at home.

1. Create a favorable space.

2. Commit to a definite amount of time.

3. Minimize distractions.

4. Plan your practice.

5. Set clear intention.

Here’s a little more on those five tips:

1. Create a favorable space.

Ideally, you’ll be able to create a space in your home that you associate with the qualities you’re cultivating in your practice. It should not be your workspace. If possible, use a hardwood floor or other firm surface. If all you have is carpet, go to the lumber yard and have a sheet of half-inch plywood ripped to 2’x7′, sand down the rough edges and you’ll have a portable hardwood surface! Now light some candles, set your music (or go music-free!) and get the room temperature just right. If it is winter and you have a fireplace, light a fire. If you have an outdoor deck and it’s comfortable being outdoors, considering an outside practice.

2. Commit to a definite amount of time.

10 minutes, 20 minutes, an hour; it doesn’t matter – except for the commitment of time.

3. Minimize distractions.

Turn off ringers, computers and other unnecessary devices that could take you out of your practice. If you have a lot of things competing for your time, write a to-do list before you begin your practice and then let it go, knowing you’ll give it all much better focus once you’ve completed your practice.

4. Plan your practice.

Even if your plan is to do a “spontaneous flow,” give yourself a sense of at least that. If you find using an instructional yoga DVD or CD helpful, then consider using it. Also consider gradually weaning yourself from it, making your practice more of your own practice. You can also find 67 sample sequences in one of my yoga teacher textbooks, Yoga Sequencing: Designing Transformative Yoga Classes.

5. Set clear intention.

Begin your practice either sitting or standing, taking a moment to reflect on what’s happening in your life and what you wish to experience in your practice (as well as after it). Take a few breaths to simply relax and find a place of deeper inner calm. Tell yourself your intention, seal it into your heart, and then release into your practice.

You can learn more about Mark and his books here, and sign up for his newsletter here.


About the Author

Bevin is the publicity and marketing manager at North Atlantic Books.